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Just Announced! Release Date for the President's 2017 Budget

Barack Obama's White House Presidential Office (D) posted a Blog Post (Office of Management and Budget) on January 7, 2016 | 5:00 pm - Original Item - Comments (View)

10 Things To Do for National Preparedness Month

Barack Obama's White House Presidential Office (D) posted a Blog Post on September 30, 2015 | 3:05 pm - Original Item - Comments (View)

Each year, our nation faces diverse threats and hazards reinforcing the need to strengthen national preparedness and resilience. On August 31st, 2015, President Obama issued a proclamation declaring September as National Preparedness Month with the theme: "Don't Wait. Communicate. Make Your Emergency Plan Today." National Preparedness Month serves as a reminder to prepare, now and throughout the year, for a wide range of emergencies.

Over 20 million registered participants will take part in the 2015 America's PrepareAthon! This isn't just about making a plan for your home; encouraging your workplace to be more prepared for a disaster can have a significant impact. Studies show that when employers urge their staff to prepare for disasters, employees are 75 percent more likely to take preparedness actions. The workplace can be one of the most effective environments for educating and encouraging people to take steps to be ready for disasters. There are plenty of resources available at ready.gov/prepare.

Here are 10 simple things you can do right now to become more prepared and resilient:

  1. Sign up for local alerts and warnings, download apps, and/or check access for wireless emergency alerts;
  2. Create and test emergency communications plans;
  3. Assemble or update emergency supplies;
  4. Conduct a drill to practice emergency response actions for local hazards;
  5. Participate in a preparedness training or class;
  6. Collect and safeguard critical documents;
  7. Document property and obtain appropriate insurance for relevant hazards;
  8. Make property improvements to reduce potential injury and property damage;
  9. Conduct an exercise or test your emergency plan; and,
  10. Plan with neighbors to help each other and share resources.

If you'd like to learn more about how to take any of these actions, download the free guide from FEMA.

Also, take a look at the Public Service Announcement prepared by the Ready Campaign and Ad Council. It provides helpful tips about how preparedness actions now can keep us and those we care for safe during an emergency.

Finally, you can participate in National PrepareAthon! Day on September 30 by visiting ready.gov/prepare to register your activities.

 

Lisa Monaco is the Assistant to the President for Homeland Security and Counterterrorism.

Why Diplomacy Matters: Follow Along as the President Heads to the 70th UN General Assembly

Barack Obama's White House Presidential Office (D) posted a Blog Post on September 29, 2015 | 9:19 am - Original Item - Comments (View)

Watch Live: President Obama Chairs the Leaders' Summit on Countering ISIL and Violent Extremism

"The people of our United Nations are not as different as they are told. They can be made to fear, they can be taught to hate, but they also respond to hope. History is littered with the failure of false prophets and fallen empires who insisted that might makes right, and that will continue to be the case. You can count on that. But we are called upon to offer a different leadership - leadership strong enough to recognize that nations share common interests and people share a common humanity."
President Barack Obama


Why Diplomacy Matters – 70 Years of the United Nations

President Obama at UNGA President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the Closing Session: Post-2015 Development Agenda, in General Assembly Hall at the United Nations in New York, N.Y. Sept. 27, 2015. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

In 1945, after two world wars had laid waste to lands and people across the globe, forty-five nations gathered together in San Francisco to find a new way forward – one that made resolution between countries possible without resorting to violence. They committed to "save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, to "promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom."

From that pledge was born the Charter of the United Nations – an international institution dedicated to international security and an enduring symbol of a simple idea:  We, as people, can always find a way to ensure the dignity and worth of human life. 

Seventy years later, that mission remains an ever-important guide in our path to a more peaceful world. Todays' conflicts are numerous and they are chronic – and every nation with the power and capacity to address these issues have an equal obligation to work together to do so effectively. 

That is what diplomacy is: Using the influence we have to resolve conflicts, protect the most vulnerable among us, and strengthen international cooperation in the pursuit of peace.

 

This week, President Obama is headed to the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) to convene with other world leaders on how we can do just that. 

From renewing sustainable development goals to combating violent extremism, here's what the President is doing at this year's UNGA: 

Sunday, September 27:

  • Speak at the closing session of the  Summit to adopt the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Watch the video 
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India

Monday, September 28:

  • Speak at the Opening Session of the 70th United Nations General Assembly. Watch the video 
  • Deliver remarks at the UN Peacekeeping Summit. Watch live 
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Vladimir Putin 

Tuesday, September 29:

  • Speak at the Leaders' Summit on Countering ISIL and Violent Extremism. Watch live 
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Raul Castro of Cuba
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Nursultan Nazarbayev of Kazakhstan

AidRefugees.gov

Read this message from U.S. Ambassador to the UN Samantha Power

 

AidRefugees.gov

Visit AidRefugees.gov


What's Up At #UNGA 

Check out the latest from UN headquarters in New York City:


ICYMI: The First Lady Launches #62MillionGirls

Today, more than 62 million girls worldwide are out of school.  Many of them simply can't afford the school fees, or the nearest school is miles away, or they just can't break through the cultural norms and traditions that deem girls unworthy of an education.

That is why the First Lady teamed up with Girl Rising to launch a new education campaign: 62 Million Girls

 

All you have to do is share a photo of yourself on Twitter or Instagram telling the world what you learned in school – something you want 62 million girls to have the opportunity to learn. Make sure you use the hashtag #62MillionGirls and then go to 62MillionGirls.com to see what other people like Stephen Colbert, Misty Copeland, Freida Pinto, and more are sharing and learn why this is a moral crisis that we can help address.

If you don't think young girls around the world understand just how important their own education is, read this letter that Chawanzi – a "girl guide" from Zambia – who wrote to the President about the importance of empowering girls and women with opportunity: 

Letter from Chawanzi to President Obama

Read the First Lady's message about this campaign and then check out 62MillionGirls.com to learn more. 


The UN Peacekeeping Summit: #UNGA

In September 2014, more than 30 countries gathered on the margins of UNGA 69 to reaffirm their support for UN peacekeeping operations and offer concrete pledges of assistance. They did so in recognition that UN peacekeeping operations are more critical than ever to international peace and security and to help fill key gaps.  But we are at a time where we are asking the UN and these peacekeeping missions to do more in more complex conflicts and these missions are under enormous strain. So this September 28th President Obama, the UN Secretary-General, and several heads of state and government will co-host a summit to convene the leaders of countries that are prepared to make significant, new, and concrete commitments to peacekeeping operations. The summit will also encourage reforms to make UN peacekeeping more effective to complement the parallel effort of the Secretary-General's High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations. 


The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: #GlobalGoals

In September of 2000, the largest gathering of world leaders came together to declare something entirely new: Together, we would form a new global partnership to reduce extreme poverty through clear cut, time-bound goals known as the Millennium Development Goals. These goals would be last for 15 years, world leaders would assess how far we've come and adopt new, sustainable goals for to build on that progress for the next 15 years.

It's 2015, and we've seen tangible progress on what we set out to do: 

  • The global share of people living on less than $1.25 per day has been slashed by more than two-thirds since 1990;
  • We have reached gender parity in primary-school enrollment, and the worldwide number of out-of-school children has been cut nearly in half;
  • The rate of child mortality has been more than halved, and the proportion of malnourished children has fallen by nearly as much;
  • 2.6 billion people gained access to clean drinking water;
  • Every continent has seen extraordinary gains – individual incomes have grown by more than one-third, at least, in every region of the developing world.

This week, President Obama is joining other world leaders to adopt new global goals which set out a global development vision and priorities for the next 15 years. This is a pivotal year for global development, in which the United States is joining countries around the world in pledging to leave no one behind based on the fundamental premise that societies are far more likely to secure lasting growth if all individuals have greater access to economic and political opportunities.

Check out the 17 new goals for sustainable development and how they will help end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all:

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals

Email from Ambassador Power: "A Chance to Help:"

Barack Obama's White House Presidential Office (D) posted a Blog Post on September 28, 2015 | 4:38 pm - Original Item - Comments (View)

This morning, Samantha Power, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, sent the following message on the refugee crisis the world is facing and what Americans can do to help relieve the suffering of so many.

AidRefugees.gov

Missed her message? Stay in touch with the White House by signing up for email updates here.


Earlier this year, a Syrian father of eight received a text message.

It informed him that the stipend he had been receiving each month to buy food for his family was being cut from $19 to $13.50 per person. This was half of what he had been receiving the year before—when his family first reached Lebanon from the war-torn Syrian city of Raqqa—and would not be enough to feed his kids.

With that amount, he told a reporter, "You can't even get bread."

Across the region, refugees fleeing the brutality of the Assad regime and ISIL have received similar news of declining support. Just this month, 229,000 Syrian refugees in Jordan learned they would no longer receive any food assistance.

There are ways you can help. Find out how at AidRefugees.gov.

Nearly 12 million Syrians have been forced from their homes by Syria's devastating conflict, four million of whom have fled their country. Syrians given refuge in neighboring countries are safe from the barrel bombings, chemical attacks, and deadly sieges they faced at home. But with few opportunities to work, most must rely on the international community to meet their most basic needs: a roof over their heads, food on their table, a classroom for their children.

This morning, President Obama spoke to the United Nations about American leadership. As the President said, America is the strongest nation in the world, and one of the ways we have always demonstrated that strength is through our compassion for people who are less fortunate.

Syria is no exception. Our government leads the world in contributions to the Syrian crisis, having given $4.5 billion to assist those in need. We have also significantly increased the number of refugees we will admit to the United States, including Syrians. And we continue to work tirelessly towards the political solution that will bring the bloodshed to an end and allow displaced Syrians to return home, as so many wish to do.

But the profound challenges faced by these families cannot be tackled by governments alone. Americans understand this, and many are asking what they can do.

We encourage you to visit AidRefugees.gov and see how you can use your skills, resources, and energy to help Syrians and other refugees in need.

Thank you,

Ambassador Samantha Power

Why Diplomacy Matters: Follow Along as the President Heads to the 70th UN General Assembly

Barack Obama's White House Presidential Office (D) posted a Blog Post on September 28, 2015 | 12:00 am - Original Item - Comments (View)

"The people of our United Nations are not as different as they are told. They can be made to fear, they can be taught to hate, but they also respond to hope. History is littered with the failure of false prophets and fallen empires who insisted that might makes right, and that will continue to be the case. You can count on that. But we are called upon to offer a different leadership - leadership strong enough to recognize that nations share common interests and people share a common humanity."
President Barack Obama

Why Diplomacy Matters – 70 Years of the United Nations

President Obama at UNGA President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the Closing Session: Post-2015 Development Agenda, in General Assembly Hall at the United Nations in New York, N.Y. Sept. 27, 2015. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

In 1945, after two world wars had laid waste to lands and people across the globe, forty-five nations gathered together in San Francisco to find a new way forward – one that made resolution between countries possible without resorting to violence. They committed to "save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, to "promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom."

From that pledge was born the Charter of the United Nations – an international institution dedicated to international security and an enduring symbol of a simple idea:  We, as people, can always find a way to ensure the dignity and worth of human life. 

Seventy years later, that mission remains an ever-important guide in our path to a more peaceful world. Todays' conflicts are numerous and they are chronic – and every nation with the power and capacity to address these issues have an equal obligation to work together to do so effectively. 

That is what diplomacy is: Using the influence we have to resolve conflicts, protect the most vulnerable among us, and strengthen international cooperation in the pursuit of peace.

 

This week, President Obama is headed to the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) to convene with other world leaders on how we can do just that. 

From renewing sustainable development goals to combating violent extremism, here's what the President is doing at this year's UNGA: 

Sunday, September 27:

  • Speak at the closing session of the  Summit to adopt the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Watch the video 
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India

Monday, September 28:

  • Speak at the Opening Session of the 70th United Nations General Assembly. Watch live 
  • Deliver remarks at the UN Peacekeeping Summit. Watch live 
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Vladimir Putin 

Tuesday, September 29:

  • Speak at the Leaders' Summit on Countering ISIL and Violent Extremism. Watch live 
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Raul Castro of Cuba
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Nursultan Nazarbayev of Kazakhstan

AidRefugees.gov

AidRefugees.gov

Visit AidRefugees.gov


What's Up At #UNGA 

Check out the latest from UN headquarters in New York City:


ICYMI: The First Lady Launches #62MillionGirls

Today, more than 62 million girls worldwide are out of school.  Many of them simply can't afford the school fees, or the nearest school is miles away, or they just can't break through the cultural norms and traditions that deem girls unworthy of an education.

That is why the First Lady teamed up with Girl Rising to launch a new education campaign: 62 Million Girls

 

All you have to do is share a photo of yourself on Twitter or Instagram telling the world what you learned in school – something you want 62 million girls to have the opportunity to learn. Make sure you use the hashtag #62MillionGirls and then go to 62MillionGirls.com to see what other people like Stephen Colbert, Misty Copeland, Freida Pinto, and more are sharing and learn why this is a moral crisis that we can help address.

If you don't think young girls around the world understand just how important their own education is, read this letter that Chawanzi – a "girl guide" from Zambia – who wrote to the President about the importance of empowering girls and women with opportunity: 

Letter from Chawanzi to President Obama

Read the First Lady's message about this campaign and then check out 62MillionGirls.com to learn more. 


The UN Peacekeeping Summit: #UNGA

In September 2014, more than 30 countries gathered on the margins of UNGA 69 to reaffirm their support for UN peacekeeping operations and offer concrete pledges of assistance. They did so in recognition that UN peacekeeping operations are more critical than ever to international peace and security and to help fill key gaps.  But we are at a time where we are asking the UN and these peacekeeping missions to do more in more complex conflicts and these missions are under enormous strain. So this September 28th President Obama, the UN Secretary-General, and several heads of state and government will co-host a summit to convene the leaders of countries that are prepared to make significant, new, and concrete commitments to peacekeeping operations. The summit will also encourage reforms to make UN peacekeeping more effective to complement the parallel effort of the Secretary-General's High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations. 


The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: #GlobalGoals

In September of 2000, the largest gathering of world leaders came together to declare something entirely new: Together, we would form a new global partnership to reduce extreme poverty through clear cut, time-bound goals known as the Millennium Development Goals. These goals would be last for 15 years, world leaders would assess how far we've come and adopt new, sustainable goals for to build on that progress for the next 15 years.

It's 2015, and we've seen tangible progress on what we set out to do: 

  • The global share of people living on less than $1.25 per day has been slashed by more than two-thirds since 1990;
  • We have reached gender parity in primary-school enrollment, and the worldwide number of out-of-school children has been cut nearly in half;
  • The rate of child mortality has been more than halved, and the proportion of malnourished children has fallen by nearly as much;
  • 2.6 billion people gained access to clean drinking water;
  • Every continent has seen extraordinary gains – individual incomes have grown by more than one-third, at least, in every region of the developing world.

This week, President Obama is joining other world leaders to adopt new global goals which set out a global development vision and priorities for the next 15 years. This is a pivotal year for global development, in which the United States is joining countries around the world in pledging to leave no one behind based on the fundamental premise that societies are far more likely to secure lasting growth if all individuals have greater access to economic and political opportunities.

Check out the 17 new goals for sustainable development and how they will help end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all:

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals

Why Diplomacy Matters: Follow Along as the President Heads to the 70th UN General Assembly

Barack Obama's White House Presidential Office (D) posted a Blog Post on September 28, 2015 | 12:00 am - Original Item - Comments (View)

Watch Live: President Obama Chairs the United Nations Peacekeeping Summit

"The people of our United Nations are not as different as they are told. They can be made to fear, they can be taught to hate, but they also respond to hope. History is littered with the failure of false prophets and fallen empires who insisted that might makes right, and that will continue to be the case. You can count on that. But we are called upon to offer a different leadership - leadership strong enough to recognize that nations share common interests and people share a common humanity."
President Barack Obama

Why Diplomacy Matters – 70 Years of the United Nations

President Obama at UNGA President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the Closing Session: Post-2015 Development Agenda, in General Assembly Hall at the United Nations in New York, N.Y. Sept. 27, 2015. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

In 1945, after two world wars had laid waste to lands and people across the globe, forty-five nations gathered together in San Francisco to find a new way forward – one that made resolution between countries possible without resorting to violence. They committed to "save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, to "promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom."

From that pledge was born the Charter of the United Nations – an international institution dedicated to international security and an enduring symbol of a simple idea:  We, as people, can always find a way to ensure the dignity and worth of human life. 

Seventy years later, that mission remains an ever-important guide in our path to a more peaceful world. Todays' conflicts are numerous and they are chronic – and every nation with the power and capacity to address these issues have an equal obligation to work together to do so effectively. 

That is what diplomacy is: Using the influence we have to resolve conflicts, protect the most vulnerable among us, and strengthen international cooperation in the pursuit of peace.

 

This week, President Obama is headed to the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) to convene with other world leaders on how we can do just that. 

From renewing sustainable development goals to combating violent extremism, here's what the President is doing at this year's UNGA: 

Sunday, September 27:

  • Speak at the closing session of the  Summit to adopt the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Watch the video 
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India

Monday, September 28:

  • Speak at the Opening Session of the 70th United Nations General Assembly. Watch live 
  • Deliver remarks at the UN Peacekeeping Summit. Watch live 
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Vladimir Putin 

Tuesday, September 29:

  • Speak at the Leaders' Summit on Countering ISIL and Violent Extremism. Watch live 
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Raul Castro of Cuba
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Nursultan Nazarbayev of Kazakhstan

AidRefugees.gov

AidRefugees.gov

Visit AidRefugees.gov


What's Up At #UNGA 

Check out the latest from UN headquarters in New York City:


ICYMI: The First Lady Launches #62MillionGirls

Today, more than 62 million girls worldwide are out of school.  Many of them simply can't afford the school fees, or the nearest school is miles away, or they just can't break through the cultural norms and traditions that deem girls unworthy of an education.

That is why the First Lady teamed up with Girl Rising to launch a new education campaign: 62 Million Girls

 

All you have to do is share a photo of yourself on Twitter or Instagram telling the world what you learned in school – something you want 62 million girls to have the opportunity to learn. Make sure you use the hashtag #62MillionGirls and then go to 62MillionGirls.com to see what other people like Stephen Colbert, Misty Copeland, Freida Pinto, and more are sharing and learn why this is a moral crisis that we can help address.

If you don't think young girls around the world understand just how important their own education is, read this letter that Chawanzi – a "girl guide" from Zambia – who wrote to the President about the importance of empowering girls and women with opportunity: 

Letter from Chawanzi to President Obama

Read the First Lady's message about this campaign and then check out 62MillionGirls.com to learn more. 


The UN Peacekeeping Summit: #UNGA

In September 2014, more than 30 countries gathered on the margins of UNGA 69 to reaffirm their support for UN peacekeeping operations and offer concrete pledges of assistance. They did so in recognition that UN peacekeeping operations are more critical than ever to international peace and security and to help fill key gaps.  But we are at a time where we are asking the UN and these peacekeeping missions to do more in more complex conflicts and these missions are under enormous strain. So this September 28th President Obama, the UN Secretary-General, and several heads of state and government will co-host a summit to convene the leaders of countries that are prepared to make significant, new, and concrete commitments to peacekeeping operations. The summit will also encourage reforms to make UN peacekeeping more effective to complement the parallel effort of the Secretary-General's High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations. 


The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: #GlobalGoals

In September of 2000, the largest gathering of world leaders came together to declare something entirely new: Together, we would form a new global partnership to reduce extreme poverty through clear cut, time-bound goals known as the Millennium Development Goals. These goals would be last for 15 years, world leaders would assess how far we've come and adopt new, sustainable goals for to build on that progress for the next 15 years.

It's 2015, and we've seen tangible progress on what we set out to do: 

  • The global share of people living on less than $1.25 per day has been slashed by more than two-thirds since 1990;
  • We have reached gender parity in primary-school enrollment, and the worldwide number of out-of-school children has been cut nearly in half;
  • The rate of child mortality has been more than halved, and the proportion of malnourished children has fallen by nearly as much;
  • 2.6 billion people gained access to clean drinking water;
  • Every continent has seen extraordinary gains – individual incomes have grown by more than one-third, at least, in every region of the developing world.

This week, President Obama is joining other world leaders to adopt new global goals which set out a global development vision and priorities for the next 15 years. This is a pivotal year for global development, in which the United States is joining countries around the world in pledging to leave no one behind based on the fundamental premise that societies are far more likely to secure lasting growth if all individuals have greater access to economic and political opportunities.

Check out the 17 new goals for sustainable development and how they will help end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all:

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals

Why Diplomacy Matters: Follow Along as the President Heads to the 70th UN General Assembly

Barack Obama's White House Presidential Office (D) posted a Blog Post on September 28, 2015 | 12:00 am - Original Item - Comments (View)
"The people of our United Nations are not as different as they are told. They can be made to fear, they can be taught to hate, but they also respond to hope. History is littered with the failure of false prophets and fallen empires who insisted that might makes right, and that will continue to be the case. You can count on that. But we are called upon to offer a different leadership - leadership strong enough to recognize that nations share common interests and people share a common humanity."
President Barack Obama

Watch Live: President Obama Chairs the United Nations Peacekeeping Summit


Why Diplomacy Matters – 70 Years of the United Nations

President Obama at UNGA President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the Closing Session: Post-2015 Development Agenda, in General Assembly Hall at the United Nations in New York, N.Y. Sept. 27, 2015. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

In 1945, after two world wars had laid waste to lands and people across the globe, forty-five nations gathered together in San Francisco to find a new way forward – one that made resolution between countries possible without resorting to violence. They committed to "save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, to "promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom."

From that pledge was born the Charter of the United Nations – an international institution dedicated to international security and an enduring symbol of a simple idea:  We, as people, can always find a way to ensure the dignity and worth of human life. 

Seventy years later, that mission remains an ever-important guide in our path to a more peaceful world. Todays' conflicts are numerous and they are chronic – and every nation with the power and capacity to address these issues have an equal obligation to work together to do so effectively. 

That is what diplomacy is: Using the influence we have to resolve conflicts, protect the most vulnerable among us, and strengthen international cooperation in the pursuit of peace.

 

This week, President Obama is headed to the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) to convene with other world leaders on how we can do just that. 

From renewing sustainable development goals to combating violent extremism, here's what the President is doing at this year's UNGA: 

Sunday, September 27:

  • Speak at the closing session of the  Summit to adopt the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. Watch the video 
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India

Monday, September 28:

  • Speak at the Opening Session of the 70th United Nations General Assembly. Watch live 
  • Deliver remarks at the UN Peacekeeping Summit. Watch live 
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Vladimir Putin 

Tuesday, September 29:

  • Speak at the Leaders' Summit on Countering ISIL and Violent Extremism. Watch live 
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Raul Castro of Cuba
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Nursultan Nazarbayev of Kazakhstan

AidRefugees.gov

AidRefugees.gov

Visit AidRefugees.gov


What's Up At #UNGA 

Check out the latest from UN headquarters in New York City:

 

"The people of our United Nations are not as different as they are told. They can be made to fear, they can be taught to...

Posted by The White House on Monday, September 28, 2015

ICYMI: The First Lady Launches #62MillionGirls

Today, more than 62 million girls worldwide are out of school.  Many of them simply can't afford the school fees, or the nearest school is miles away, or they just can't break through the cultural norms and traditions that deem girls unworthy of an education.

That is why the First Lady teamed up with Girl Rising to launch a new education campaign: 62 Million Girls

 

All you have to do is share a photo of yourself on Twitter or Instagram telling the world what you learned in school – something you want 62 million girls to have the opportunity to learn. Make sure you use the hashtag #62MillionGirls and then go to 62MillionGirls.com to see what other people like Stephen Colbert, Misty Copeland, Freida Pinto, and more are sharing and learn why this is a moral crisis that we can help address.

If you don't think young girls around the world understand just how important their own education is, read this letter that Chawanzi – a "girl guide" from Zambia – who wrote to the President about the importance of empowering girls and women with opportunity: 

Letter from Chawanzi to President Obama

Read the First Lady's message about this campaign and then check out 62MillionGirls.com to learn more. 


The UN Peacekeeping Summit: #UNGA

In September 2014, more than 30 countries gathered on the margins of UNGA 69 to reaffirm their support for UN peacekeeping operations and offer concrete pledges of assistance. They did so in recognition that UN peacekeeping operations are more critical than ever to international peace and security and to help fill key gaps.  But we are at a time where we are asking the UN and these peacekeeping missions to do more in more complex conflicts and these missions are under enormous strain. So this September 28th President Obama, the UN Secretary-General, and several heads of state and government will co-host a summit to convene the leaders of countries that are prepared to make significant, new, and concrete commitments to peacekeeping operations. The summit will also encourage reforms to make UN peacekeeping more effective to complement the parallel effort of the Secretary-General's High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations. 


The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: #GlobalGoals

In September of 2000, the largest gathering of world leaders came together to declare something entirely new: Together, we would form a new global partnership to reduce extreme poverty through clear cut, time-bound goals known as the Millennium Development Goals. These goals would be last for 15 years, world leaders would assess how far we've come and adopt new, sustainable goals for to build on that progress for the next 15 years.

It's 2015, and we've seen tangible progress on what we set out to do: 

  • The global share of people living on less than $1.25 per day has been slashed by more than two-thirds since 1990;
  • We have reached gender parity in primary-school enrollment, and the worldwide number of out-of-school children has been cut nearly in half;
  • The rate of child mortality has been more than halved, and the proportion of malnourished children has fallen by nearly as much;
  • 2.6 billion people gained access to clean drinking water;
  • Every continent has seen extraordinary gains – individual incomes have grown by more than one-third, at least, in every region of the developing world.

This week, President Obama is joining other world leaders to adopt new global goals which set out a global development vision and priorities for the next 15 years. This is a pivotal year for global development, in which the United States is joining countries around the world in pledging to leave no one behind based on the fundamental premise that societies are far more likely to secure lasting growth if all individuals have greater access to economic and political opportunities.

Check out the 17 new goals for sustainable development and how they will help end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all:

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals

Why Diplomacy Matters: Follow Along as the President Heads to the 70th UN General Assembly

Barack Obama's White House Presidential Office (D) posted a Blog Post on September 28, 2015 | 12:00 am - Original Item - Comments (View)

Watch Live: President Obama Addresses the 70th United Nations General Assembly


Why Diplomacy Matters – 70 Years of the United Nations

President Obama at UNGA President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the Closing Session: Post-2015 Development Agenda, in General Assembly Hall at the United Nations in New York, N.Y. Sept. 27, 2015. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

In 1945, after two world wars had laid waste to lands and people across the globe, forty-five nations gathered together in San Francisco to find a new way forward – one that made resolution between countries possible without resorting to violence. They committed to "save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, to "promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom."

From that pledge was born the Charter of the United Nations – an international institution dedicated to international security and an enduring symbol of a simple idea:  We, as people, can always find a way to ensure the dignity and worth of human life. 

Seventy years later, that mission remains an ever-important guide in our path to a more peaceful world. Todays' conflicts are numerous and they are chronic – and every nation with the power and capacity to address these issues have an equal obligation to work together to do so effectively. 

That is what diplomacy is: Using the influence we have to resolve conflicts, protect the most vulnerable among us, and strengthen international cooperation in the pursuit of peace.

 

This week, President Obama is headed to the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) to convene with other world leaders on how we can do just that. 

From renewing sustainable development goals to combating violent extremism, here's what the President is doing at this year's UNGA: 

Sunday, September 27:

  • Speak at the closing session of the  Summit to adopt the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. WATCH LIVE
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India

Monday, September 28:

  • Speak at the Opening Session of the 70th United Nations General Assembly. WATCH LIVE
  • Deliver remarks at the UN Peacekeeping Summit. WATCH LIVE
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Vladimir Putin 

Tuesday, September 29:

  • Speak at the Leaders' Summit on Countering ISIL and Violent Extremism. WATCH LIVE
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Raul Castro of Cuba
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Nursultan Nazarbayev of Kazakhstan

What's Up At #UNGA 

Check out the latest from UN headquarters in New York City:

Pete Souza's Instragram of the UN


ICYMI: The First Lady Launches #62MillionGirls

Today, more than 62 million girls worldwide are out of school.  Many of them simply can't afford the school fees, or the nearest school is miles away, or they just can't break through the cultural norms and traditions that deem girls unworthy of an education.

That is why the First Lady teamed up with Girl Rising to launch a new education campaign: 62 Million Girls

 

All you have to do is share a photo of yourself on Twitter or Instagram telling the world what you learned in school – something you want 62 million girls to have the opportunity to learn. Make sure you use the hashtag #62MillionGirls and then go to 62MillionGirls.com to see what other people like Stephen Colbert, Misty Copeland, Freida Pinto, and more are sharing and learn why this is a moral crisis that we can help address.

If you don't think young girls around the world understand just how important their own education is, read this letter that Chawanzi – a "girl guide" from Zambia – who wrote to the President about the importance of empowering girls and women with opportunity: 

Letter from Chawanzi to President Obama

Read the First Lady's message about this campaign and then check out 62MillionGirls.com to learn more. 


The UN Peacekeeping Summit: #UNGA

In September 2014, more than 30 countries gathered on the margins of UNGA 69 to reaffirm their support for UN peacekeeping operations and offer concrete pledges of assistance. They did so in recognition that UN peacekeeping operations are more critical than ever to international peace and security and to help fill key gaps.  But we are at a time where we are asking the UN and these peacekeeping missions to do more in more complex conflicts and these missions are under enormous strain. So this September 28th President Obama, the UN Secretary-General, and several heads of state and government will co-host a summit to convene the leaders of countries that are prepared to make significant, new, and concrete commitments to peacekeeping operations. The summit will also encourage reforms to make UN peacekeeping more effective to complement the parallel effort of the Secretary-General's High-Level Independent Panel on Peace Operations. 


The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: #GlobalGoals

In September of 2000, the largest gathering of world leaders came together to declare something entirely new: Together, we would form a new global partnership to reduce extreme poverty through clear cut, time-bound goals known as the Millennium Development Goals. These goals would be last for 15 years, world leaders would assess how far we've come and adopt new, sustainable goals for to build on that progress for the next 15 years.

It's 2015, and we've seen tangible progress on what we set out to do: 

  • The global share of people living on less than $1.25 per day has been slashed by more than two-thirds since 1990;
  • We have reached gender parity in primary-school enrollment, and the worldwide number of out-of-school children has been cut nearly in half;
  • The rate of child mortality has been more than halved, and the proportion of malnourished children has fallen by nearly as much;
  • 2.6 billion people gained access to clean drinking water;
  • Every continent has seen extraordinary gains – individual incomes have grown by more than one-third, at least, in every region of the developing world.

This week, President Obama is joining other world leaders to adopt new global goals which set out a global development vision and priorities for the next 15 years. This is a pivotal year for global development, in which the United States is joining countries around the world in pledging to leave no one behind based on the fundamental premise that societies are far more likely to secure lasting growth if all individuals have greater access to economic and political opportunities.

Check out the 17 new goals for sustainable development and how they will help end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all:

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals

Why Diplomacy Matters: Follow Along as the President Heads to the 70th UN General Assembly

Barack Obama's White House Presidential Office (D) posted a Blog Post on September 27, 2015 | 11:45 am - Original Item - Comments (View)

Why Diplomacy Matters – 70 Years of the United Nations

 

President Obama at UNGA President Barack Obama delivers remarks at the Closing Session: Post-2015 Development Agenda, in General Assembly Hall at the United Nations in New York, N.Y. Sept. 27, 2015. (Official White House Photo by Pete Souza)

In 1945, after two world wars had laid waste to lands and people across the globe, forty-five nations gathered together in San Francisco to find a new way forward – one that made resolution between countries possible without resorting to violence. They committed to "save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, to "promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom."

From that pledge was born the Charter of the United Nations – an international institution dedicated to international security and an enduring symbol of a simple idea:  We, as people, can always find a way to ensure the dignity and worth of human life. 

Seventy years later, that mission remains an ever-important guide in our path to a more peaceful world. Todays' conflicts are numerous and they are chronic – and every nation with the power and capacity to address these issues have an equal obligation to work together to do so effectively. 

That is what diplomacy is: Using the influence we have to resolve conflicts, protect the most vulnerable among us, and strengthen international cooperation in the pursuit of peace.

 

This week, President Obama is headed to the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) to convene with other world leaders on how we can do just that. 

From renewing sustainable development goals to combating violent extremism, here's what the President is doing at this year's UNGA: 

Sunday, September 27:

  • Speak at the closing session of the  Summit to adopt the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. WATCH LIVE
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India

Monday, September 28:

  • Speak at the Opening Session of the 70th United Nations General Assembly. WATCH LIVE
  • Deliver remarks at the UN Peacekeeping Summit. WATCH LIVE
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Vladimir Putin 

Tuesday, September 29:

  • Speak at the Leaders' Summit on Countering ISIL and Violent Extremism. WATCH LIVE
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Raul Castro of Cuba
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Nursultan Nazarbayev of Kazakhstan

What's Up At #UNGA 

Check out the latest from UN headquarters in New York City:

Pete Souza's Instragram of the UN


ICYMI: The First Lady Launches #62MillionGirls

Today, more than 62 million girls worldwide are out of school.  Many of them simply can't afford the school fees, or the nearest school is miles away, or they just can't break through the cultural norms and traditions that deem girls unworthy of an education.

That is why the First Lady teamed up with Girl Rising to launch a new education campaign: 62 Million Girls

 

All you have to do is share a photo of yourself on Twitter or Instagram telling the world what you learned in school – something you want 62 million girls to have the opportunity to learn. Make sure you use the hashtag #62MillionGirls and then go to 62MillionGirls.com to see what other people like Stephen Colbert, Misty Copeland, Freida Pinto, and more are sharing and learn why this is a moral crisis that we can help address.

If you don't think young girls around the world understand just how important their own education is, read this letter that Chawanzi – a "girl guide" from Zambia – who wrote to the President about the importance of empowering girls and women with opportunity: 

Letter from Chawanzi to President Obama

Read the First Lady's message about this campaign and then check out 62MillionGirls.com to learn more. 


The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: #GlobalGoals

In September of 2000, the largest gathering of world leaders came together to declare something entirely new: Together, we would form a new global partnership to reduce extreme poverty through clear cut, time-bound goals known as the Millennium Development Goals. These goals would be last for 15 years, world leaders would assess how far we've come and adopt new, sustainable goals for to build on that progress for the next 15 years.

It's 2015, and we've seen tangible progress on what we set out to do: 

  • The global share of people living on less than $1.25 per day has been slashed by more than two-thirds since 1990;
  • We have reached gender parity in primary-school enrollment, and the worldwide number of out-of-school children has been cut nearly in half;
  • The rate of child mortality has been more than halved, and the proportion of malnourished children has fallen by nearly as much;
  • 2.6 billion people gained access to clean drinking water;
  • Every continent has seen extraordinary gains – individual incomes have grown by more than one-third, at least, in every region of the developing world.

This week, President Obama is joining other world leaders to adopt new global goals which set out a global development vision and priorities for the next 15 years. This is a pivotal year for global development, in which the United States is joining countries around the world in pledging to leave no one behind based on the fundamental premise that societies are far more likely to secure lasting growth if all individuals have greater access to economic and political opportunities.

Check out the 17 new goals for sustainable development and how they will help end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all:

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals

Why Diplomacy Matters: Follow Along as the President Heads to the 70th UN General Assembly

Barack Obama's White House Presidential Office (D) posted a Blog Post on September 27, 2015 | 11:45 am - Original Item - Comments (View)

Why Diplomacy Matters – 70 Years of the United Nations

 

In 1945, after two world wars had laid waste to lands and people across the globe, forty-five nations gathered together in San Francisco to find a new way forward – one that made resolution between countries possible without resorting to violence. They committed to "save succeeding generations from the scourge of war, to "promote social progress and better standards of life in larger freedom." From that pledge was born the Charter of the United Nations – an international institution dedicated to international security and an enduring symbol of a simple idea:  We, as people, can always find a way to ensure the dignity and worth of human life. 

Seventy years later, that mission remains an ever-important guide in our path to a more peaceful world. Todays' conflicts are numerous and they are chronic – and every nation with the power and capacity to address these issues have an equal obligation to work together to do so effectively. 

That is what diplomacy is: Using the influence we have to resolve conflicts, protect the most vulnerable among us, and strengthen international cooperation in the pursuit of peace.

 

This week, President Obama is headed to the United Nations General Assembly (UNGA) to convene with other world leaders on how we can do just that. 

From renewing sustainable development goals to combating violent extremism, here's what the President is doing at this year's UNGA: 

Sunday, September 27:

  • Speak at the closing session of the  Summit to adopt the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. WATCH LIVE
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with Prime Minister Narendra Modi of India

Monday, September 28:

  • Speak at the Opening Session of the 70th United Nations General Assembly. WATCH LIVE
  • Deliver remarks at the UN Peacekeeping Summit. WATCH LIVE
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Vladimir Putin 

Tuesday, September 29:

  • Speak at the Leaders' Summit on Countering ISIL and Violent Extremism. WATCH LIVE
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Raul Castro of Cuba
  • Hold a bilateral meeting with President Nursultan Nazarbayev of Kazakhstan

What's Up At #UNGA 

Check out the latest from UN headquarters in New York City:

 

 


ICYMI: The First Lady Launches #62MillionGirls

Today, more than 62 million girls worldwide are out of school.  Many of them simply can't afford the school fees, or the nearest school is miles away, or they just can't break through the cultural norms and traditions that deem girls unworthy of an education.

That is why the First Lady teamed up with Girl Rising to launch a new education campaign: 62 Million Girls

 

All you have to do is share a photo of yourself on Twitter or Instagram telling the world what you learned in school – something you want 62 million girls to have the opportunity to learn. Make sure you use the hashtag #62MillionGirls and then go to 62MillionGirls.com to see what other people like Stephen Colbert, Misty Copeland, Freida Pinto, and more are sharing and learn why this is a moral crisis that we can help address.

If you don't think young girls around the world understand just how important their own education is, read this letter that Chawanzi – a "girl guide" from Zambia – who wrote to the President about the importance of empowering girls and women with opportunity: 

Letter from Chawanzi to President Obama

Read the First Lady's message about this campaign and then check out 62MillionGirls.com to learn more. 


The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development: #GlobalGoals

In September of 2000, the largest gathering of world leaders came together to declare something entirely new: Together, we would form a new global partnership to reduce extreme poverty through clear cut, time-bound goals known as the Millennium Development Goals. These goals would be last for 15 years, world leaders would assess how far we've come and adopt new, sustainable goals for to build on that progress for the next 15 years.

It's 2015, and we've seen tangible progress on what we set out to do: 

  • The global share of people living on less than $1.25 per day has been slashed by more than two-thirds since 1990;
  • We have reached gender parity in primary-school enrollment, and the worldwide number of out-of-school children has been cut nearly in half;
  • The rate of child mortality has been more than halved, and the proportion of malnourished children has fallen by nearly as much;
  • 2.6 billion people gained access to clean drinking water;
  • Every continent has seen extraordinary gains – individual incomes have grown by more than one-third, at least, in every region of the developing world.

This week, President Obama is joining other world leaders to adopt new global goals which set out a global development vision and priorities for the next 15 years. This is a pivotal year for global development, in which the United States is joining countries around the world in pledging to leave no one behind based on the fundamental premise that societies are far more likely to secure lasting growth if all individuals have greater access to economic and political opportunities.

Check out the 17 new goals for sustainable development and how they will help end poverty, protect the planet, and ensure prosperity for all:

The 17 Sustainable Development Goals

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